blackamazon
ethiopienne:

Submit to Contemporary Queer's second issue: Bodies.

This issue asks you to consider bodies through space and time. Your body. The bodies you like. The bodies you’d like. The bodies of your ancestors or descendants. What our bodies convey when we perform certain behaviors or don’t. What we consider “whole” and “partial.” Musculature. Skin color. Photography. Art. The definitions we apply to our bodies versus the definitions others ascribe to us. Representations and appropriations. Gender. Disease. Settler. Indigenous. What role does culture play when it comes to our bodies? What does protection mean? What are our boundaries? How do our bodies affect us? Do food and environment play significant roles? Immigration. Prison. Slavery. Trafficking. Modeling. Servitude. Commodification. Markets. Mockery. Sexuality. Beauty ideals. Virtual bodies. Physical bodies. Digital bodies. Celebrated bodies. Reviled bodies. Incarcerated bodies. Free bodies. Space. Movement. Movement through physical space. Movement through symbolic space.If you have a poetry, prose (fiction/nonfiction), essays, interviews, photo series, etc. that you think would be a great fit for this issue, keep us in mind. Follow @ConQueerZINE on Twitter and the hashtag #ConQueerBODIES if you’d like to join the ongoing discussion.

ethiopienne:

Submit to Contemporary Queer's second issue: Bodies.

This issue asks you to consider bodies through space and time. Your body. The bodies you like. The bodies you’d like. The bodies of your ancestors or descendants. What our bodies convey when we perform certain behaviors or don’t. What we consider “whole” and “partial.” Musculature. Skin color. Photography. Art. The definitions we apply to our bodies versus the definitions others ascribe to us. Representations and appropriations. Gender. Disease. Settler. Indigenous. What role does culture play when it comes to our bodies? What does protection mean? What are our boundaries? How do our bodies affect us? Do food and environment play significant roles? Immigration. Prison. Slavery. Trafficking. Modeling. Servitude. Commodification. Markets. Mockery. Sexuality. Beauty ideals. Virtual bodies. Physical bodies. Digital bodies. Celebrated bodies. Reviled bodies. Incarcerated bodies. Free bodies. Space. Movement. Movement through physical space. Movement through symbolic space.

If you have a poetry, prose (fiction/nonfiction), essays, interviews, photo series, etc. that you think would be a great fit for this issue, keep us in mind. Follow @ConQueerZINE on Twitter and the hashtag #ConQueerBODIES if you’d like to join the ongoing discussion.

blackwomenworldhistory

dynamicafrica:

In honor of International Literacy Day, I compiled a list of some of my favourite books written by African authors (with the exception of the book about Fela). There are many books I could’ve added to this post but these were the first that came to mind.

There’s no order to this list and each comes highly recommended as they, in some way, changed me for the better. If I had to pick a favourite it would undoubtedly be Zimbabwean writer Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions simply because it was the first book I read in which I related so deeply to several of the characters - and still do. From Nyasha’s struggle with depression and being caught between two cultures she feels alienated by, to Tambu’s hunger for a world beyond her circumstances. Ugandan author Okot p’Bitek’s Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol comes in a close second, it’s just about as cheeky and blunt as I am in some parts and, perhaps a little out of narcissism, is why I enjoyed it.

Between these 18 books you’ll find everything from the personal to the political, and everything in-between. There’s love, there’s romance, there’s struggle, there’s strife, there’s beauty and there’s ugly too. No story is as simple as their titles may suggest, just read Camara Laye’s L’enfant Noir (The African Child) that explores the author’s early childhood in Guinea under French colonisation, or South African writer Sol Plaatjie’s historical novel Mhudi written in 1919 that placed a woman at the center of a story that deals with survival, displacement and early European colonisation in South Africa.

For anyone interested in reading these books, I found some of them available online (not all are complete):

schomburgcenter
schomburgcenter:

i found god in myself: The 40th Anniversary of Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls
September 19, 2014 to January 3, 2015Since its debut performance in California in 1974, Shange’s work has captivated, provoked, inspired and transformed audiences all over the world. Turning to the choreopoem not simply as an engaging work of text or drama but as a well of social, political and deeply personal issues affecting the lives of women of color, the exhibition will feature 20 specially commissioned pieces in honor of each individual poem, additional non-commissioned artworks on display at satellite locations that address the work’s themes and archival material donated by Shange.The exhibition’s title is drawn from one of the last lines recited in the finale poem a laying on of hands. The title suggests that navigating through the complexities of what it means to be of color and female is only enlightened by an understanding, acceptance and appreciation of self. With self-empowerment comes the process of “…moving to the ends of their own rainbows.” By presenting visual works from both women and men, all races and various generations, i found god in myself explores the universality inherent in Shange’s powerful message to the world.A series of spoken word performances, screenings, panels, a community art project and a guided art crawl will accompany the exhibitionFor more information click here. 

schomburgcenter:

i found god in myself: The 40th Anniversary of Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls

September 19, 2014 to January 3, 2015

Since its debut performance in California in 1974, Shange’s work has captivated, provoked, inspired and transformed audiences all over the world. Turning to the choreopoem not simply as an engaging work of text or drama but as a well of social, political and deeply personal issues affecting the lives of women of color, the exhibition will feature 20 specially commissioned pieces in honor of each individual poem, additional non-commissioned artworks on display at satellite locations that address the work’s themes and archival material donated by Shange.

The exhibition’s title is drawn from one of the last lines recited in the finale poem a laying on of hands. The title suggests that navigating through the complexities of what it means to be of color and female is only enlightened by an understanding, acceptance and appreciation of self. With self-empowerment comes the process of “…moving to the ends of their own rainbows.” By presenting visual works from both women and men, all races and various generations, i found god in myself explores the universality inherent in Shange’s powerful message to the world.

A series of spoken word performances, screenings, panels, a community art project and a guided art crawl will accompany the exhibition

For more information click here

nayyirahwaheed
readcolor:

nayyirah waheed | u.s. | adé by rebecca walker | english | fiction | ‘this is my second time reading adé. it’s a gorgeous and wide story, which rebecca walker writes with such lush accuracy. her language in this novel is emotion sweltering with emotion. so ripe it falls off the page. adé is a love story i have truly fallen in love with.’ | #ireadCOLORbecause it is a soft place to land. | #readCOLOR #ireadCOLORbecause

readcolor:

nayyirah waheed | u.s. | adé by rebecca walker | english | fiction | ‘this is my second time reading adé. it’s a gorgeous and wide story, which rebecca walker writes with such lush accuracy. her language in this novel is emotion sweltering with emotion. so ripe it falls off the page. adé is a love story i have truly fallen in love with.’ | #ireadCOLORbecause it is a soft place to land. | #readCOLOR #ireadCOLORbecause

nayyirahwaheed
readcolor:

readCOLOR is a global online visual literacy project which supports and celebrates readers of color engaging with works created by authors of color.readCOLOR serves as a bridge which facilitates the visibility of authors of color in communities across the world, while allowing readers of color to become aware of the incredible abundance of literature which reflects and represents them. through such visibility, readCOLOR seeks to assist in the preservation of the many languages spoken by communities of color, promote literacy, and become an interactive literary resource which brings authors and readers of color from around the world, together.it is our hope that readCOLOR will help to remove the barriers that artists and audiences of color face in accessing one another, and ease the difficulty in finding representation in literature.readCOLOR is created and curated by a circle of creatives which include: yrsa daley-ward. desiree venn frederic. l.a. winter. tapiwa mugabe. and nayyirah waheed.participating is simple + easy.
individualssubmit photo of yourself with book. or book alone.with caption including:
your name (optional)city or country (optional)title. author. language of book. genre of book.why this book/author?#ireadCOLORbecause __________. (please answer)book clubssubmit photo of yourself. and/or book club. with book.
with caption including:
your name  (optional)city or country (optional)title. author. language of book. genre of book.why you started/joined the book club?why your club selected this book/author?#wereadCOLORbecause__________. (please answer)authorssubmit photo of yourself with your book. or another authors’ book. or book alone.
with caption including:
your namecity or countrytitle. author. language of book. genre of book.why this book/author?#ireadCOLORbecause _________.(answer if another authors’ book) #iwriteCOLORbecause_________. (answer if your book own)send submissions to ireadCOLOR@gmail.comsubmissions are subject to approval.
chosen submissions will be featured on readCOLOR’s social media platforms.
instagram: readCOLORtumblr: readcolor@gmail.comtwitter: @readCOLORemail: ireadcolor@gmail.com
#hashtagsreaders are invited to discuss utilizing hashtags:#ireadCOLORbecause, #readCOLORauthors are invited to discuss utilizing hashtags:#iwriteCOLORbecause, #writeCOLOR, #ireadCOLORbecause, #readCOLORreadCOLOR and share !

readcolor:

readCOLOR is a global online visual literacy project which supports and celebrates readers of color engaging with works created by authors of color.

readCOLOR serves as a bridge which facilitates the visibility of authors of color in communities across the world, while allowing readers of color to become aware of the incredible abundance of literature which reflects and represents them. through such visibility, readCOLOR seeks to assist in the preservation of the many languages spoken by communities of color, promote literacy, and become an interactive literary resource which brings authors and readers of color from around the world, together.

it is our hope that readCOLOR will help to remove the barriers that artists and audiences of color face in accessing one another, and ease the difficulty in finding representation in literature.

readCOLOR is created and curated by a circle of creatives which include: yrsa daley-ward. desiree venn frederic. l.a. winter. tapiwa mugabe. and nayyirah waheed.



participating is simple + easy.



individuals

submit photo of yourself with book. or book alone.

with caption including:


your name (optional)
city or country (optional)
title. author. language of book. genre of book.
why this book/author?
#ireadCOLORbecause __________. (please answer)


book clubs

submit photo of yourself. and/or book club. with book.

with caption including:


your name  (optional)
city or country (optional)
title. author. language of book. genre of book.
why you started/joined the book club?
why your club selected this book/author?
#wereadCOLORbecause__________. (please answer)


authors

submit photo of yourself with your book. or another authors’ book. or book alone.

with caption including:


your name
city or country
title. author. language of book. genre of book.
why this book/author?
#ireadCOLORbecause _________.(answer if another authors’ book) #iwriteCOLORbecause_________. (answer if your book own)


send submissions to ireadCOLOR@gmail.com

submissions are subject to approval.


chosen submissions will be featured on readCOLOR’s social media platforms.


instagram: readCOLOR
tumblr: readcolor@gmail.com
twitter: @readCOLOR
email: ireadcolor@gmail.com



#hashtags

readers are invited to discuss utilizing hashtags:

#ireadCOLORbecause, #readCOLOR

authors are invited to discuss utilizing hashtags:

#iwriteCOLORbecause, #writeCOLOR, #ireadCOLORbecause, #readCOLOR






readCOLOR and share !